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It’s impossible to discuss the new Call of Duty game without mentioning its size. The sheer magnitude of the software, in total gigabytes, has become perhaps the most defining and talked-about aspect of the long-running shooter series since the reboot of Modern Warfare last fall and the launch of Activision’s Warzone battle royale a few months later.

The overall bloat of the experience has become both the franchise’s central selling point and its biggest flaw. In a bid to create the do-everything shooter that can compete with Fortnite and other live service games, Activision and the many studios it tasks with making a new Call of Duty every year have created something so monstrously all-encompassing that it is difficult to both literally and figuratively fit other games into your rotation.

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But last year, Call of Duty became something altogether different. Activision yanked its most successful, formulaic moneymaker into the future by tying it together with a fully baked battle royale mode, Warzone, now one of the most popular on the market. The company promised an ever-evolving Call of Duty that could remain a stable fixture by adding what it needed and subtracting what it didn’t as the annual cycle progresses.